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New tool aids surgeons with bad posture in the OR
Researchers at the University at Buffalo (UB) have developed a new tool to identify poor posture and correct awkward positions for surgeons in the operating room.
Human teeth likely shrank due to tool use
Wisdom teeth may have shrunk during human evolution as part of changes that started with human tool use, according to a new study.
Gene-filtering tool to identify disease-causing mutations
Despite their bad reputations, the vast majority of mutations are not harmful. Even in very rare genetic disorders, only one or two genetic variations — out of tens of thousands — is actually the cause of disease. Distinguishing between harmful and harmless mutations has long been a challenge.
Chinese environmentalists wield new legal tool
As Beijing choked on 'red alert' air pollution, Chinese delegates pledged to curb emissions at global climate change talks in Paris. A final accord was reached on Dec. 12 among nearly 200 nations seeking to avert future environmental disaster.
New diabetes diagnostic tool
Researchers from University of Exeter have developed a new test to help diagnoses diabetes, which they say will lead to more effective diagnosis and patient care.
New tool to improve PD diagnosis
A group of experts working under the umbrella of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (MDS), have developed a new tool for healthcare professionals that they hope will mark a significant advancement in the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), especially in its early stages. The results of their study could also have a major impact on the quality of research on Parkinson's disease.
Books best tools to fight terrorism: UN official
Public Information Officer of the UN Information Center in Tehran Maria Dotsenko said Monday that education, book and literature are the most influential tools in fighting terrorism.
New tool for exploring cells in 3D created
Researchers can now explore viruses, bacteria and components of the human body in more detail than ever before with software developed at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI).

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