News ID: 202250
Published: 0616 GMT October 12, 2017

Violation of JCPOA by Trump will have int’l consequences: Salehi

Violation of JCPOA by Trump will have int’l consequences: Salehi

Iran's top atomic energy official said on Wednesday that breaching the 2015 nuclear deal by the US President Donald Trump will entail global repercussions.

Chairman of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) Ali Akbar Salehi made the remarks in a meeting with a group of media elites and researchers of British think tanks, IRNA reported.

The US president is to decide whether he certify the landmark nuclear deal between Iran and the world six major powers or not. He has signaled that he is to withdraw his endorsement of the 2015 nuclear deal which is also known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA).

Trump's administration has so far twice certified Iran’s compliance with the deal. However, if he refuses to do so for a third time, then the Congress will have 60 days to decide whether to re-impose sanctions waived under the deal. That would let Congress effectively decide whether to kill the historic deal.

Many of the US politicians, even a number of Trump’s allies in the White House, as well as his international allies, the European states in particular, have so far warned the US president against trying to kill the nuclear deal calling it an “international deal” which cannot be killed unilaterally. They all stressed the UN nuclear watchdog’s position that has repeatedly verified Iran’s compliance with the historic nuclear agreement.

More in his meeting in London, Salehi hailed European states and other parties’ stances in support of the JCPOA, saying that Iran will take appropriate decision considering US administration’s behavior towards the nuclear deal. 

Salehi arrived in London late on Tuesday upon an invitation by the British Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs Boris Johnson.

   
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